Classical Symmetry

The heirs to this principle represent a regal tradition, in which architecture and interior design are unmistakeable status symbols. Properties, social status, collections and even every day choices form a kind of status pyramid, at the summit of which are personality and the authority it radiates. I am the ruler of everything!
To the Sun King
Accordingly, luxury is never a goal in itself. The task of any design, arrangement and detail is to focus attention on the centre. The Baroque enfilade is the symmetrical axis of the palace, which leads to the Sun King. Attributes of taste, which seemingly glow in themselves, always form a unique constellation.
Inspiring example
The compass rose at the centre of the room illustrates this world order, and the flawlessly organised environment around it, are testimony to the authority of the master. This environment does not follow an example; it sets one. It is inspires followers, while driving copiers into despair with its inimitability.
Iconic status
Over the course of its 350 year old history, the classical Versailles parquet pattern has become an iconic cultural asset; a brand, which in terms of its recognisability is comparable to the refinement of a diamond, Veuve Clicquot champagne, Coco Chanel’s little black dress and Aston Martin cars.
As with every outstanding icon – the Versailles pattern has flourished in the face of both changing fashions and revolutions. It was equally highly appreciated by followers of Louis XIV, post-revolution era industrialists and Art Nouveau philanthropists, who often bought authentic parquet from aristocrats who had fallen upon hard times, in order to pass it on as an heirloom from generation to generation.
Classical Versailles pattern
Outstanding in its simplicity, this pattern acquired its name from what was once the most prestigious palace in the world: Versailles, the residence of the kings of France, which dictated fashion throughout Europe and its colonies. Even though it dominates buildings in France and the surrounding region in particular, in modern interiors this classic remains as popular as ever.
Versailles variation
This deliberately aged oak floor makes a pleasant contrast to contemporary design in this variation of the Versailles pattern.
Monticello variation
The classical floor solution – inlay parquet with border - forms the self-sufficient base for the harmonious design of a room. In the interior designed by Larisa Pomeščikova, the dominant white colour stands out elegantly on the exotic wood floor created as a variation of the Monticello pattern. The pattern owes its name to one of the founding fathers of the United States of America and its third President Thomas Jefferson.
Parquet patterns
The most popular classical parquet patterns are Versailles, d’Aremberg, Herringbone, Chantilly, Monticello and Chevron. Each serves as the basis for an infinite number of pattern variations, which in the hands of a true master are transformed into wonderful derivations of classical exemplars. Refining proportions and the selection of wood, many of these have acquired their own names and become classics worth adopting. Indeed, our collections contain a few masterpieces whose creation we are truly proud of.

Classical Versailles pattern

Outstanding in its simplicity, this pattern acquired its name from what was once the most prestigious palace in the world: Versailles, the residence of the kings of France, which dictated fashion throughout Europe and its colonies. Even though it dominates buildings in France and the surrounding region in particular, in modern interiors this classic remains as popular as ever.

Versailles variation

This deliberately aged oak floor makes a pleasant contrast to contemporary design in this variation of the Versailles pattern.

Monticello variation

The classical floor solution – inlay parquet with border - forms the self-sufficient base for the harmonious design of a room. In the interior designed by Larisa Pomeščikova, the dominant white colour stands out elegantly on the exotic wood floor created as a variation of the Monticello pattern. The pattern owes its name to one of the founding fathers of the United States of America and its third President Thomas Jefferson.
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